[Podcast] Chatty AF 34: Tokyo Godfathers Retrospective

Just in time for the holidays, Vrai, Dee, and Peter take a look back at Satoshi Kon’s penultimate feature film, Tokyo Godfathers! Highlights include: Everyone missing the hell out of Kon, a deep-dive into the film’s humanizing (albeit imperfect) focus on marginalized groups, unfortunate translations, and Hana handily stealing the show.

[Interview] Arina Tanemura, shoujo manga artist

Since her debut over 20 years ago with I.O.N., Arina Tanemura’s name has been synonymous with shojo manga. Her work, published primarily in Ribon magazine, is known for its elaborate linework and use of magical girls and idol singers. Her stories often touch on more mature themes such as mortality and trauma, while still remaining appealing and accessible to younger audiences. Two of these series, Phantom Thief Jeanne and Full Moon O Sagashite, have been adapted into anime.

[AniFemTalk] 12 Days of Anime

It’s that time of year again: bloggers all over the internet are signing up to write a dozen posts on the anime of 2017. AniFem isn’t participating this year, but we wanted to open the discussion up to our readers: what were your standouts of 2017?

[My Fave is Problematic] Kare Kano

I was in middle school when I first got ahold of Volume 1 of Masumi Tsuda’s Kareshi Kanojo no Jijou, often shortened to Kare Kano and released in English as His and Her Circumstances (or Kare Kano: His and Her Circumstances for the manga). The award-winning series details the lives of two outwardly “perfect” honor students, Yukino Miyazawa and Soichiro Arima, as they accidentally uncover one another’s imperfections, fall in love, and agree to be true to themselves.

[AniFemTalk] Socially conscious stories

All media shapes our sense of the world and how we understand and empathize with each other, but some creators are more conscious in their attempts to address serious issues: ones where the main themes are about inequality in media or society, or are dedicated to focusing on lives and identities not found in most popular media. And because they aim so high, they can wind up being very hit or miss.

[History] Not Just A Man’s Job: How war involves (and hurts) everybody in Gundam 0080

A memorable scene from Mobile Suit Gundam 0080: War in the Pocket highlights the horrors of war: after much damage to the town, paramedics pull a female pilot out of a wrecked Gundam surrounded by debris. Our protagonist, a young boy named Al, is shocked, pupils as dilated as can be. To him, this female pilot occupies a very different sphere: a domestic one. In fact, she’s his old babysitter.

[AniFemTalk] Positively depicting sex and sexuality

Sex isn’t a four letter word, and all forms of sexuality (including asexuality and romantic interest) are part of the human experience. It’s only natural that those things will be part of our media. The conversation about when and how to talk about sex, or to have sexy characters (especially female characters) in an ethical and non-exploitative way, gets way more complicated.

[Feature] Princess Mononoke as a force of nature

San, the titular Princess Mononoke, is a force of nature, uncompromising and undaunted by violence. Raised in nature, she sought to become its hand of vengeance against humanity. A young woman pursuing her own goals against ignorance and petty enmity is a typical (albeit early) example of Hayao Miyazaki’s dedication to well-rounded female characters.

[Review] Anime Supremacy! is the SHIROBAKO sequel you’ve been waiting for

Anime Supremacy!, written by Mizuki Tsujimura and translated by Deborah Boliver Boehm, tells the interconnected stories of three women—a producer, a director, and an animator—working in the anime industry. Not quite a novel and not quite a short story collection, the book is divided into three main chapters, each following one of the protagonists through part of a single anime season.