[Links] 28 June – 4 July 2017

Premieres are starting in earnest as Pride Month comes to a close in the US.

AniFem Round-Up

[Review] Fox Spirit Matchmaker – episode 1

Has some initial promise but far too many characters and not enough focus.

[Review] Knight’s & Magic – episode 1

A perfectly functional premiere that has all the warning signs of a Bad LN Adaptation.

[Review] Clean Freak! Aoyama kun – episode 1

Might be sweet if it can keep up the premiere’s dedication to being sympathetic rather than exploitative of its titular character’s mental illness.

[Podcast] Chatty AF 13: Shirobako watchalong – episodes 19-24

The end of AniFem’s first watchalong. What did you think?

[AniFemTalk] Spring 2017 wrap-up

Before we dive into summer, what are your thoughts on spring’s season?

Beyond AniFem

Popular Isekai Light Novel Adaptations as Guys Who Lived in Your Freshman Dorm (I Have a Heroine Problem)

Some LN protagonists can be insufferable. Sometimes it is good to laugh at this in new and interesting ways.

Sword Art Online is Kyle
Kyle is really into respecting women, and he wants everyone to know about it. He likes to say that his greatest role model is his mom, because she worked so hard to raise him and his sister without any handouts. His real role model is Jean Claude van Damme, but he doesn’t tell anyone that. He doesn’t believe in the wage gap – it only seems that way, but if you really look at the data, it’s because women have different priorities in life. Besides, he wouldn’t want his wife to earn more than him because what would they do when she left her job to raise their kids?

I am a Woman. You are an Asshole. (Athena Talks)

Feminism must be intersectional or be worthless. This article is an important reminder of how damaging TERF rhetoric can be.

Myth 6.
It Is Sufficient to Pay Lip Service to Trans People’s Preferred Pronouns and Healthcare While Arguing Against Their Identities and Social Belonging in Our Gendered Space.
No, It is not enough. Get the word “ally” out of your mouth!
Transphobia, homophobia and misogyny are all interwoven in a terrible cocktail of bad. When a little boy is beaten up for putting on lipstick, is it because they think he’s a faggot and they think they can beat it out of him? Is it because they think he might be a disgusting tranny? Or is it just that he’s acting like a woman and the worst thing a boy could be like is a woman? They might articulate one of those options, but all of them are connected by the denigration of femininity and the violence of patriarchy. When we resist, we must resist on all axes of oppression in solidarity with each other.

Openly Gay Manga Creator Gengoroh Tagame Talks Breaking Barriers with My Brother’s Husband (Barnes & Nobles)

An interview about Tagame’s process and the reception of the work from conception to publication.

How is the book being received in Japan? Do you feel like your message is getting across?
The response in Japan has been overwhelmingly positive and the reviews have been great. As far as I know the publisher hasn’t received any sort of religious or morally-based sort of backlash. I certainly haven’t. But historically, gay media has been sort of a lesser form. People don’t take it very seriously. It’s viewed as sort of weird. I am predominantly known by general audiences as a gay artist, so straight readers who had no idea went in assuming this would be another [example of that]. But on the other hand, because I am known as a gay artist, parts of the internet just went completely bonkers, like “Why is a pornographer doing a general audience manga in a youth magazine?

Women in Japan cite being judged at work as top concern for taking maternity leave: survey (The Japan Times)

Many companies in Japan still aren’t equipped to aid women who want to have children and continue working, leading to stress among employees.

The reaction of their bosses was the top concern, cited by 37.6 percent, followed by how they will be viewed by colleagues at 32.4 percent. About 30 percent also cited an atmosphere in the office that discourages taking child care leave more than once.
The annual survey, which began in 2013, also asked for the first time whether the nation is moving toward a society that offers a favorable environment for having and raising children. Over 70 percent of women answered that they do not think so.

YouTube Japan Compiles “Pride Playlist” of Educational LGBT Videos (Takurei’s Room)

Unfortunately, most of these videos lack English subtitles. Nonetheless, we wanted to include this great resource of Japan’s LGBTQ community speaking on their own behalf.

Commercial reveals what some LGBT individuals go through in Japan (SoraNews24)

Another video featuring interviews with LGBTQ individuals talking about their struggles and goals. This one was distributed across Japan.

Rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people have seen improvements in Japan, with same-sex couples recognized by Sapporo and a few wards in Tokyo. Recognition comes in the form of legally non-binding certificates, which allow couples to be treated as if they’re married when it comes to things like life insurance or apartment rentals.
It is far from sufficient though, and in an effort to raise awareness and promote LGBT rights, Tokai Television Broadcasting produced a series of commercials that gives a glimpse into the minds of LGBT individuals.

Kat’s Most Anticipated Summer 2017 Anime: NTR: Netsuzou Trap (Anime Now!)

The author expresses her hope that this summer’s yuri short series will be a positive, representational one.

Let me be clear, given my experiences as a queer person in Japanese society and Japanese schools. There is a significant amount of queer people in Japan and queer students in Japanese schools. While I do not tend to talk about my sexuality openly in the classroom, it’s not hard to figure out, and I’ve been in the position of being the first adult some students decide to tell about their own sexuality. Other times, I may be the first person outside the home to be told—especially when parents or family members are often not supportive.

Addendum: Yuri blog Okazu stated that they won’t be covering NTR due to finding its approach objectionable.

Dating In Japan: Foreign Women Share Their Stories (Savvy Tokyo)

Foreigners from around the globe discuss their experiences looking for partners and being in cross-cultural relationships.

“I went out with a Japanese guy for a few weeks, and then one night, he told me we couldn’t date anymore because he was sure I’d had plastic surgery because I was Korean, and that’s what Korean women do to find husbands. I’ve never even dyed my hair before.” (Sarah, 26, Korean American).
“Generally, my experience was marred by the fact that the Japanese often assumed that because I’m of a Filipino background that I’m in Japan as a sex-worker. I can’t tell you how many times the police stopped me to check my gaijin card and then incredulously ask if I was really there to work for my company. It was almost a weekly occurrence. It didn’t help that I would go home past 10 in the evening. I have been asked “How much?” by many Japanese men and this question was often accompanied with a lewd hand gesture or an unwarranted exposure of genitals when I was minding my own business.” (Anne, 31, Filipino Australian).
“The advice I would give is 100 percent just be yourself. But, be careful to be a good listener. Japanese guys are often more subtle than we’re used to in the West. Listen and always reconfirm the meaning, even if you think you’re sure. I found that this is actually a very useful skill in any situation, not just for dating and not just for dating someone outside your own culture.” (Victoria, 30, Greek American)

BONUS: I Wish I Was Straight | Coming Out (YouTube)

Beckii, a YouTuber who became famous in Japan for dancing to J-Pop and might be well known to older anime fans, recently published a video discussing coming to terms with her sexuality.

AniFem Community

As the LGBTQ+ community carries on fighting for rights around the globe, Takurei’s Room wrote a good thread about framing the discussion (while keeping the push for those necessary liberties):

We’re flat out with reviews and some behind the scenes overhauling at the moment, but we would still love to hear from you about what you thought of the spring anime season, what you’ve got your eye on this summer, and whether you’ve read any great manga lately – let us know in comments!

 

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