[Yearbook] Two podcasts…

In February, I realised for the first time how important LGBTQ+ women are to Anime Feminist. Anything we put out relating to Miss Kobayashi’s Dragon Maid got a huge, enthusiastic and nuanced response from a range of queer women and femmes.

It’s hard to remember now, but at that time I was still in the mindset of defusing potential tension with would-be critics. The team had consistently reminded me that we should be focusing our efforts on the people we wanted to be in our community, not those we didn’t want anywhere near it. This was my first time really getting a taste of how rewarding that could be.

[Yearbook] And a Nazi in a pear tree…

Over the past 12 months, Anime Feminist has achieved a lot. 292 posts, a regular podcast, a patron-exclusive discussion forum, our first convention panel and party—and, of course, following through on our wish to pay every writer, editor and administrator who contributes to the success of the site.

To all our patrons: thank you. Thank you, thank you, thank you. You make it possible for us to not just do our work, but to do it both ethically and to a high standard. (Over the next 12 days, I’ll be giving some insider information so you can see just how true that is.)

[AniFemTalk] Translation and localization missteps

Anime translation and localization has had something of a learning curve over the years. Sometimes that meant changing character names in an attempt to appeal to a young English-speaking audience, and sometimes it meant more problematic translation choices that misconstrued meaning (see our recent Tokyo Godfathers podcast).

Translation is an art form in and of itself, and we certainly don’t mean to belittle the hard work translators put into a job that can oftentimes seem thankless; however, like all art forms, it’s also worth discussing with a critical eye. So this week, let’s talk about the pitfalls of translation and localization—and don’t worry, we’ll talk about positive examples next week.

[Podcast] Chatty AF 34: Tokyo Godfathers Retrospective

Just in time for the holidays, Vrai, Dee, and Peter take a look back at Satoshi Kon’s penultimate feature film, Tokyo Godfathers! Highlights include: Everyone missing the hell out of Kon, a deep-dive into the film’s humanizing (albeit imperfect) focus on marginalized groups, unfortunate translations, and Hana handily stealing the show.

[AniFemTalk] 12 Days of Anime

It’s that time of year again: bloggers all over the internet are signing up to write a dozen posts on the anime of 2017. AniFem isn’t participating this year, but we wanted to open the discussion up to our readers: what were your standouts of 2017?

[AniFemTalk] Socially conscious stories

All media shapes our sense of the world and how we understand and empathize with each other, but some creators are more conscious in their attempts to address serious issues: ones where the main themes are about inequality in media or society, or are dedicated to focusing on lives and identities not found in most popular media. And because they aim so high, they can wind up being very hit or miss.

[AniFemTalk] Positively depicting sex and sexuality

Sex isn’t a four letter word, and all forms of sexuality (including asexuality and romantic interest) are part of the human experience. It’s only natural that those things will be part of our media. The conversation about when and how to talk about sex, or to have sexy characters (especially female characters) in an ethical and non-exploitative way, gets way more complicated.