[Yearbook] And a Nazi in a pear tree…

Over the past 12 months, Anime Feminist has achieved a lot. 292 posts, a regular podcast, a patron-exclusive discussion forum, our first convention panel and party – and, of course, following through on our wish to pay every writer, editor and administrator who contributes to the success of the site. To all our patrons: thank you. Thank you, thank you, thank you. You make it possible for us to not just do our work, but to do it both ethically and to a high standard. (Over the next 12 days, I’ll be giving some insider information so you can see just how true that is.)

[Feature] REAL and portrayals of disability

In the manga REAL, Takehiko Inoue uses three similarly aged young men—Tomomi Nomiya, Togawa Kiyoharu, and Hisonobu Takahashi—to portray different aspects of physical disability. In using the perspectives of an able-bodied survivor, someone who has been disabled for a number of years, and someone who is faced with becoming disabled, Inoue captures many of the complexities and stigmas of physical disability. By looking at these characters and their interplay, we can delve further into some of the ways Real succeeds and fails at portraying disability.

[AniFemTalk] Translation and localization missteps

Anime translation and localization has had something of a learning curve over the years. Sometimes that meant changing character names in an attempt to appeal to a young English-speaking audience, and sometimes it meant more problematic translation choices that misconstrued meaning (see our recent Tokyo Godfathers podcast).

Translation is an art form in and of itself, and we certainly don’t mean to belittle the hard work translators put into a job that can oftentimes seem thankless; however, like all art forms, it’s also worth discussing with a critical eye. So this week, let’s talk about the pitfalls of translation and localization—and don’t worry, we’ll talk about positive examples next week.

[Podcast] Chatty AF 34: Tokyo Godfathers Retrospective

Just in time for the holidays, Vrai, Dee, and Peter take a look back at Satoshi Kon’s penultimate feature film, Tokyo Godfathers! Highlights include: Everyone missing the hell out of Kon, a deep-dive into the film’s humanizing (albeit imperfect) focus on marginalized groups, unfortunate translations, and Hana handily stealing the show.

[Interview] Arina Tanemura, shoujo manga artist

Since her debut over 20 years ago with I.O.N., Arina Tanemura’s name has been synonymous with shojo manga. Her work, published primarily in Ribon magazine, is known for its elaborate linework and use of magical girls and idol singers. Her stories often touch on more mature themes such as mortality and trauma, while still remaining appealing and accessible to younger audiences. Two of these series, Phantom Thief Jeanne and Full Moon O Sagashite, have been adapted into anime.

[AniFemTalk] 12 Days of Anime

It’s that time of year again: bloggers all over the internet are signing up to write a dozen posts on the anime of 2017. AniFem isn’t participating this year, but we wanted to open the discussion up to our readers: what were your standouts of 2017?